Do you ever wonder how so many cocktails are invented and everyone keeps them all straight — or doesn’t? Like how you can consult one Very Trustworthy Published Source and get Recipe A for a cocktail of some historical note, and then you reference Another Such Source and Recipe B is variegated enough that you’re like, huh? Because if roads and bridges, whatever the recipe is for making them is, if those had been so casually bandied about we’d all be geographically stranded at best and dead from falling asphalt at worst.

Sometimes I think about those things. I thought about them recently while we were mixing Honeymoons.┬áDoing so was actually the PhoBlograpHusband‘s idea, since we recently acquired our first-ever bottle of Applejack. We got Laird’s, natch, because JERZEEEEE! (Like Laird’s, Sean and I are from New Jersey.)

Anyway, here are different historical factoids about Honeymoons you can choose to accept or ignore at will, because apparently everybody else has:

- The Honeymoon was created in the 1930s in “a long since departed New York bar called Brown Derby.”

- Or, the Honeymoon “is one of the signature cocktails from the Brown Derby in Hollywood that was probably featured alongside other 1930s legends.”

- The cocktail also goes by The Farmer’s Daughter.

- It is made with raw egg white, or not. Or, it is made with lemon juice, or not. Basically, there are permutations with and without either or both. (“Even if you are right, that’ll be one plus one plus two plus one not one plus TWO plus one plus one.”)

The morals of the story: Fobody’s nerfect. The world is a strange and muddled place. Let’s shut up and drink already.

The Honeymoon

(this is the recipe we like best for it)

2 ounces Laird’s Applejack

1/2 ounce Benedictine

1/2 ounce triple sec

1/2 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice

Lemon peel, to garnish

Combine all liquid ingredients in an ice-filled cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with lemon peel.

Tasting Notes

I am sure this tastes ah-MA-zing with an ounce of raw egg white as well. If you go this route, do a dry shake (in the shaker, all liquid ingredients, no ice) before your wet (with ice) one.

The Chow.com iteration of the recipe swaps in apple slices for lemon peel on the garnish, but then again, they also don’t call for lemon juice. Just FYI.

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